How to cook: Dinuguan (pork and blood stew)

Dinuguan comes from the root word dugo, or blood. This dish is so named because it is a stew made with the blood of a freshly-slaughtered pig. Traditionally cooked using a mixture of pork cheeks, lungs and intestines, this version — made with pork belly, cheeks and liver — should make the not-too-adventurous less squeamish.

But… blood? Sure. Blood. Cooking with blood is nothing new and not even unique to the Philippines. Dishes cooked with blood are found in various cuisines — Chinese, Thai, Vietnamese, British, French, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Scandinavian… Blood sausages and haggis are made with blood.

The blood of freshly-slaughtered pig is available in local wet markets. The blood is usually kept in a cooler so, when sold, there are often solid masses. That doesn’t mean that the blood isn’t fresh. It is natural for blood to coagulate when it cools. In Antipolo, where we live, the butcher gives it for free with the purchase of meat. »